An analysis of marriage in the taming of the shrew by shakespeare

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An analysis of marriage in the taming of the shrew by shakespeare

Prior to the first act, an induction frames the play as a "kind of history" played in front of a befuddled drunkard named Christopher Sly who is tricked into believing that he is a lord. The play is performed in order to distract Sly from his "wife," who is actually Bartholomew, a servant, dressed as a woman.

In the play performed for Sly, the "shrew" is Katherina, the eldest daughter of Baptista Minola, a lord in Padua. Numerous men, including Gremio and Tranio, deem Katherina an unworthy option for marriage because of her notorious assertiveness and willfulness.

On the other hand, men such as Hortensio and Gremio are eager to marry her younger sister Bianca. However, Baptista has sworn Bianca is not allowed to marry until Katherina is wed; this motivates Bianca's suitors to work together to find Katherina a husband so that they may compete for Bianca.

The plot thickens when Lucentio, who has recently come to Padua to attend university, falls in love with Bianca. Overhearing Baptista say that he is on the lookout for tutors for his daughters, Lucentio devises a plan in which he disguises himself as a Latin tutor named Cambio in order to woo Bianca behind Baptista's back and meanwhile has his servant Tranio pretend to be him.

In the meantime, Petruchioaccompanied by his servant Grumio, arrives in Padua from Verona. He explains to Hortensio, an old friend of his, that since his father's death he has set out to enjoy life and wed.

Hearing this, Hortensio recruits Petruchio as a suitor for Katherina. He also has Petruchio present Baptista a music tutor named Litio Hortensio in disguise.

From the SparkNotes Blog

Thus, Lucentio and Hortensio, attempt to woo Bianca while pretending to be the tutors Cambio and Litio. To counter Katherina's shrewish nature, Petruchio pretends that any harsh things she says or does are actually kind and gentle.

Katherina agrees to marry Petruchio after seeing that he is the only man willing to counter her quick remarks; however, at the ceremony Petruchio makes an embarrassing scene when he strikes the priest and drinks the communion wine.

After the wedding, Petruchio takes Katherina to his home against her will. Once they are gone, Gremio and Tranio disguised as Lucentio formally bid for Bianca, with Tranio easily outbidding Gremio.

However, in his zeal to win, he promises much more than Lucentio actually possesses. When Baptista determines that once Lucentio's father confirms the dowryBianca and Tranio i.

Lucentio can marry, Tranio decides that they will need someone to pretend to be Vincentio, Lucentio's father.

An analysis of marriage in the taming of the shrew by shakespeare

Meanwhile, Tranio persuades Hortensio that Bianca is not worthy of his attentions, thus removing Lucentio's remaining rival. Leslie illustration of Act 4, Scene 3 Petruchio upbraiding the tailor for making an ill-fitting dress.

In Verona, Petruchio begins the "taming" of his new wife. She is refused food and clothing because nothing — according to Petruchio — is good enough for her; he claims that perfectly cooked meat is overcooked, a beautiful dress doesn't fit right, and a stylish hat is not fashionable.

Along the way, they meet Vincentio, who is also on his way to Padua, and Katherina agrees with Petruchio when he declares that Vincentio is a woman and then apologises to Vincentio when Petruchio tells her that he is a man.

Back in Padua, Lucentio and Tranio convince a passing pedant to pretend to be Vincentio and confirm the dowry for Bianca. The man does so, and Baptista is happy for Bianca to wed Lucentio still Tranio in disguise.

Bianca, aware of the deception, then secretly elopes with the real Lucentio to get married. However, when Vincentio reaches Padua, he encounters the pedant, who claims to be Lucentio's father. Tranio still disguised as Lucentio appears, and the pedant acknowledges him to be his son Lucentio.

In all the confusion, the real Vincentio is set to be arrested, when the real Lucentio appears with his newly betrothed Bianca, revealing all to a bewildered Baptista and Vincentio.

Lucentio explains everything, and all is forgiven by the two fathers. Meanwhile, Hortensio has married a rich widow. In the final scene of the play there are three newly married couples; Bianca and Lucentio, the widow and Hortensio, and Katherina and Petruchio.

Because of the general opinion that Petruchio is married to a shrew, a good-natured quarrel breaks out amongst the three men about whose wife is the most obedient. Petruchio proposes a wager whereby each will send a servant to call for their wives, and whichever comes most obediently will have won the wager for her husband.

Katherina is the only one of the three who comes, winning the wager for Petruchio. She then hauls the other two wives into the room, giving a speech on why wives should always obey their husbands. The play ends with Baptista, Hortensio and Lucentio marvelling at how successfully Petruchio has tamed the shrew.

Sources[ edit ] Although there is no direct literary source for the induction, the tale of a tinker being duped into believing he is a lord is one found in many literary traditions.

Another is found in De Rebus Burgundicis by the Dutch historian Pontus de Huyter, where Philip, Duke of Burgundyafter attending his sister's wedding in Portugal, finds a drunken "artisan" whom he entertains with a "pleasant Comedie.

He could also have known the Duke of Burgundy story as, although De Rebus wasn't translated into French untiland into English untilthere is evidence the story existed in English in a jest book now lost by Richard Edwardeswritten in A summary of Themes in William Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew.

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Taming of the Shrew and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

The shrew – an unpleasant, ill-tempered woman characterised by scolding, nagging, and aggression – is a comedic, stock character in literature and folklore, both Western and Eastern. The best-known work with this theme is probably Shakespeare's play The Taming of the leslutinsduphoenix.com figure represents insubordinate female behaviour in a .

This article presents a possible chronological listing of the composition of the plays of William Shakespeare.. Shakespearean scholars, beginning with Edmond Malone in , have attempted to reconstruct the relative chronology of Shakespeare's oeuvre by various means, using external evidence (such as references to the plays by Shakespeare's .

Hamlet by William Shakespeare - The play Hamlet, written by William Shakespeare, builds up a story beginning with the murder of Hamlet`s father, as it leads to the downfall of not only Claudius, Old King Hamlet`s brother, but also Hamlet`s death, as the story slowly unravels with the death of many other characters, and the events that shape the .

Camp Shakespeare. If you can act Shakespeare, you can act anything. – Michael Kahn, Artistic Director. Every summer, the Shakespeare Theatre Company gives students between the ages of 7 and 18 the chance to dive into the world of the greatest playwright in history: William Shakespeare.

An index of monologues by William Shakespeare. All's Well That Ends Well. comic monologue for a man. All's Well That Ends Well.

SparkNotes: The Taming of the Shrew: Themes